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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
and acquisitions in 2013. he's robert profusek, chairman of the global m&a practice at jones day. so bob why you are so up beat about more mergers and being a acquisitions especially with everything going on with the fiscal cliff. >> it's a pessimistic time andtn the merger market. m & a has been fantastic. 9 market has been okay. it's not been at th terrible bus been good. it's been held back by the negativism that was focused on the eu and this year it's the fiscal cliff and the election and everything else. the conditions are there. we need more m. & a in this cup. >> you are saying they are notgt ablocksblockbustermega deals buo medium companies, why is that. >> to do a step out deal therehe sense that things are good. m & a needs to be done. growth is thro slow and one of e ways to rise is to buy. everything is good but we have been held back by the negativism by the fiscal issues europe and the u.s. >> susie: you told me there were oil and gas americ mergersu think that tech could be an air yeah wirarea. what kind of gived guidelines can you give to investors so they can take advantage of
welcome. i'm bob abernethy, and this is our annual look back at the top religion and ethics news of the year. religion and ethics managing editor kim lawton is here, and so are kevin kstr, edor i ief religion news service, and e.j. dionne, senior fellow at the brookings institution, professor at georgetown university and columnist for "the washington post." welcome to you all. kim has put together a short video reminder of what happened in 2012. >> a wave of mass shootings renewed age-old theological discussions about evil, suffering and tragedy. especially after the massacre at the connecticut elementary school, many religious leaders repeated calls for stricter gun control measures. some called it a pro-life issue. one of the mass shootings took place in a house of worship. in august, six people were killed when a gunman opened fire at a sikh temple in oak creek, wisconsin. once again, religion played an important role in the presidential election. for the first time ever, there were no white protestants on either ticket. although there wasn't a lot of god talk from president
headlines in 2013. welcome. i'm bob abernethy and this is our look ahead at the top religion stories we expect to be covering in 2013. we do this with the help of kim lawton, managing editor of this program, kevin eckstrom, editor in chieff regionnews service, and e.j. dionne, a senior fellow at the brookings institution, a professor at georgetown university and a columnist for the washington post. welcome to you all. one of the big events of the new year will be the inauguration of barack obama to a second term, so we asked a wide variety of religion leaders what they hope for during the president's next term. >> if president obama would revert back to the, that young, powerful, firey spokesperson in the 2004 democratic national convention who talked about reconciling the blue and the red state, about the god of the blue state and the god of the red state that i believe that he has a chance to really emerge as a transformative catalytic president reconciling our nation. we are more polarized today than ever before. >> i'm hoping that he would be able to work, well that congress would b
from republican senator bob corker. tonight, we get a different perspective on the question of so-called entitlements. many lawmakers and economists have argued it's essential to make big changes to medicare and social secity. o tho ideas are rsing the eligibility age; means- testing for wealthy recipients; cuts in spending and benefits and a bigger role for private competition in health care. max richtman has been arguing against making many of these changes as part of this fight. he's the president of an advocacy group, the national committee to preserve social security and medicare. he joins us now. >> welcome. >> thank you for inviting me. >> first of all, why shouldn't social security and medicare be part of the entire group of government spending programs that arebeing looked at to get to deal with the deficits? >> well, before i answer that i was very interested in the way you characterized these programs as entitlements. so-called, you said, entitlements. and we think that a better term would be earned benefits. you know, i counted the letters in the word "entitlement." th
senator bob corker. gwen ifill has our next installment. >> ifill: a senior democrat on the house banking committee and the vice chair of the centrist new democrat coalition. welcome, congresswoman. we heard earlier today from john boehner and from jay carneyt the whit housnesaying spding cuts aren't serious coming from the house and the other saying the white house has put forth all the spending cuts that need to be put out. how do you prioritize what should be the focus here: spending cuts or raising revenue? >> most of us know it's got to be both. the fact is the president put out a really very sensible plan, middle-ground where it actually included spending cuts. we've already done a trillion dollars and we'll be doing another trillion dollars over a trillion dollars in cuts. that's $2 trillion. that's serious spendg cu overnd above what we've done already. and of course we do think there has to be some revenue. then we're going to make sure we're doing the right kind of investments so we see economic growth. if it's not all three we're not going to get there. the math doesn't add up.
department did not shift funds or ask for emergency money. bob corker of tennessee minced no words in his assessment. >> what i saw in the report is a department that has sclerosis. that doesn't think outside the box. that is not using the resources that it has in any kind of creative ways. is not prioritizing. i cannot imagine sending folks out to benghazi after what we saw from the security cameras and the drones. >> reporter: deputy secretary burns said the answer, in part, is that despite growing lawlessness in benghazi, in his words, "we made the mistaken assumption that we wouldn't become a major target." >> the truth is, across eastern there had been a tendency-- not just in the case of eastern libya, but i think across the world in recent years-- for us to focus too much on specific credible threats, and sometimes and, i think that's something that, you know, we were painfully reminded of in the case of the benghazi attack, and we need to do better at. >> reporter: to that end, deputy secretary nides promised swift action on all of the report's 29 recommendations. >> implementatio
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)